Posted by: acooksca | 03/08/2012

Yuba Pork Spring Rolls

Yuba Pork Spring Rolls

Yuba Pork Spring Rolls

At the Hodo Soy Beanery they make the point that their soy products aren’t just pale substitutes for meat protein. In fact, their yuba (tofu skins, also called beancurd sheets) make an excellent low calorie wrap for traditional pork spring rolls. No deep frying needed here, the pork and vegetable filling retains a bright, fresh taste. The rolls are just as tasty at room temperature and hold their shape so that they can be cut into bite-sized pieces for a passed appetizer. Use an interesting dipping sauce for added complexity, such as the Vietnamese dipping sauce below.

 

1/3 # ground pork
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 yolks
2 large garlic cloves
2 scallions
¼ cup loosely packed cilantro leaves
1 oz. dry rice vermicelli
½ cup bean sprouts
6 – oz Hodo Soy fresh Yuba, or dried yuba sheets (see Cook’s Note below)
1 tablespoon vegetable or peanut oil

Mash the pork with the sugar, salt and yolks. In a food processor, or by hand, finely chop the garlic, scallions and cilantro. Add to the pork. Soften the vermicelli by soaking it in water too warm to the touch until pliable, about 10 minutes. Drain well. Finely chop the vermicelli and the bean sprouts and blend into the pork.

Gently open up the yuba sheets to flat and cut into 6×8-inch squares. Place 2 tablespoons pork filling along the bottom 1/3 of a sheet, gently shaping it into a cylinder. Lift the bottom edge over the filling. Fold in the side edges over the filling. Form into a roll about 2 inches long and 1 inch wide. If the rolls don’t seal well, brush a streak of water then a streak of flour or cornstarch on one edge and seal. Set aside and continue rolling the rest. To avoid sticking, do not stack. Rolls can be made several hours ahead, kept covered and refrigerated.
 
Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. When hot, add the vegetable oil to the skillet and brush over the bottom. Add the rolls and fry, turning occasionally, until golden brown (about 5 minutes). Do this in batches, if needed. Return all the rolls to the skillet. Add ½ cup water, cover the skillet and let steam until the water is gone and the pork is cooked, about 5 minutes.

Let cool several minutes to before cutting. Serve with a soy sauce based dipping sauce or Vietnamese dipping sauce which follows.

Yield 8-10 rolls

Vietnamese Dipping Sauce

¼ cup mild fish sauce
1 large garlic clove, minced
1 fresh small red chili, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons sugar

Makes about 1 cup

Cook’s Note: Yuba is the Japanese name for fresh tofu skins such as those produced by Hodo Soy Beanery. Tofu sheets can also be found semi-dried and dried in Asian markets. These need to be dampened or soaked in hot water to make them pliable enough to roll (look for directions on the package).  Semi-dried and dried sheets will be less tender than fresh once cooked and may need to be cooked longer. The longer you steam them the softer the skins become, but the drier the pork filling. For cooking a larger batch brown the rolls and stack in a steamer to be steamed for 10 minutes.

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Responses

  1. Karen,
    We have an Asian market here, and I’ll try to see if this is something that they carry. Sounds like a recipe that we would like!

  2. Those look great. Remind me of the tofu skin dim sum I so adore.

    • Michelle, you are right to be reminded of the Chinese dim sum stuffed tofu skins. In these the filling is from a cooking school in Hanoi so they reflect a north Vietnamese taste… but how many times was the cuisine of North Viet Nam been influenced by her neighbor to the north? Glad you like it and I looked into your blog and really enjoyed it! I will follow your posts. K


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